Village of
Weedsport
Cayuga County, NY
 


For information contact:

 

Village Office  (315) 834-6634; FAX (315) 834-9110
Sue Lamphere, Village Clerk                 E-Mail:   vweedsport@villageofweedsport.org 

Diane Scheufele, Village Treasurer        E-Mail:   vtreas@villageofweedsport.org  

 

Office Hours:  M - F 8:00AM - 4:30PM; Summer Hours:  8:00AM - 4:00PM

 

Court for Village of Weedsport - call (315) 834-8634; E-Mail:  villcourt@villageofweedsport.org

Court Held:  Monday 7:00PM

Court Clerk Hours:    Tuesday and Thursday 8:00AM - 3:00PM

 

Department of Public Works  (315) 834-6411; FAX (315) 834-9110

James Saroodis, Superintendent of Public Works

Address:

Village Office

Village Court

 

Address:

8892 South Street

PO Box 190

Weedsport, NY  13166

 

DPW Complex:

Hours:  M - Th 6:00AM - 3:30PM; Fri 7:00AM - 11:00AM

Recycling Center:  Thursday 9:00AM - 3:00PM; Saturday 7:00AM - 3:30PM

2621 Earl Street

Weedsport, NY  13166


News:
6-Step New York State Zika Action Plan
May 05, 2016
Call 1-888-364-4723 go get a starter kit of mosquito dunks (larvicide tablets)
Annual Drinking Water Quality Report for 2015
April 13, 2016

  Annual Drinking Water Quality Report for 2015

Village of Weedsport

8892 South Street, Weedsport NY 13166

(Public Water Supply ID#0501726)

Website: villageofweedsport.org

 

Introduction

To comply with State and Federal regulations, the Village of Weedsport, will be annually issuing a report describing the quality of your drinking water.  The purpose of this report is to raise your understanding of drinking water and awareness of the need to protect our drinking water sources.  Last year, your tap water met all State drinking water health standards.  We are proud to report that our system did not violate a maximum contaminant level or any other water quality standard. This report provides an overview of last year’s water quality.  Included are details about where your water comes from, what it contains, and how it compares to State standards. 

 

If you have any questions about this report or concerning your drinking water, please contact Jim Saroodis, Supt. of Public Works at (315) 834-6411. We want you to be informed about your drinking water.  If you want to learn more, please attend any of our regularly scheduled village board meetings. The meetings are held on the 2nd Wednesday of each month at 7pm at the Village Hall, located at 8892 South Street, Weedsport, NY. A copy of this annual report may also be viewed at our website: villageofweedsport.org

 

Where does our water come from?

In general, the sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells.  As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals, and in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activities.  Contaminants that may be present in source water include: microbial contaminants; inorganic contaminants; pesticides and herbicides; organic chemical contaminants; and radioactive contaminants.  In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the State and the EPA prescribe regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems.  The State Health Departments and the FDAs regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which must provide the same protection for public health.

 

Our water source is Owasco Lake. The Village of Weedsport buys their water from the Town of Sennett who in turn is supplied by the City of Auburn. The City of Auburn owns and operates two Water Filtration Plants, a Rapid Sand Filtration Plant and a Slow Sand Filtration Plant both is located at the corner of Swift St. and Pulsifer Drive in the City of Auburn. After filtration the water is disinfected by injection of liquid Chlorine before introduction to the distribution system. The finished water is pumped through the City of Auburn distribution system to the Town of Sennett distribution system and then into the Village of Weedsport system through a meter vault located on Weedsport-Sennett Road near the Village of Weedsport. Prior to entering the Village of Weedsport distribution system the water flows through our chlorine booster station where chlorine is added as necessary to elevate chlorine residuals to acceptable levels. Water not consumed by our customers is then stored in a four hundred fifty thousand-gallon concrete reservoir. Our system serves a population of approximately 2300 people from 720 service connections.

 

Owasco Lake is classified as a Class – AA Special water body designated by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) as listed in 6 NYCRR Part 702. It is considered an excellent source of potable water and must be protected.

 

In order to ensure that the tap water is safe to drink, the NYSDOH prescribes regulations that limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. The City treats its water according to EPA’s and the NYSDOH’s regulations. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which must provide the same protection for public health.

 

The City of Auburn has a program of Watershed Protection to enforce regulations, promulgated by law under NYCRR Section 1100 (Public Health).

 

Are there contaminants in our drinking water?

As the State regulations require, we routinely test your drinking water for numerous contaminants. These contaminants include: total coliform, turbidity, inorganic compounds, nitrate, nitrite, lead and copper, volatile organic compounds, total trihalomethanes, and haloacetic acids, radiological synthetic organic compounds. The table presented below depicts which compounds were detected in your drinking water.  The State allows us to test for some contaminants less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants do not change frequently.  Some of our data, though representative, are more than one year old.

 

It should be noted that all drinking water, including bottled drinking water, might be reasonably expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants.  The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.  More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPAs Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791) or the Cayuga County Health Department at (315) 253-1405.

 

CONTAMINANT

VIOLATION YES/NO

DATE OF SAMPLE

 LEVEL DETECTED (AVE RANGE)

 UNIT MEASUREMENT

MCLG

REGULATORY LIMIT (MCL,TT OR AL)

LIKELY SOURCE OF CONTAMINATION

 

 

 

PHYSICAL Turbidity 1

No

5 days per week

0.19 Avg range

0.07– 2.50

NTU

N/A

5.0 distribution system

Soil

runoff

 

 

PHYSICAL

Turbidity 1

No

7 days per week

0.06 Avg range

0.01-0.45

NTU

N/A 

0.3-1.0 MCL filter performance

Soil

runoff

 

 

ORGANICS Trihalomethanes,

Total

No

2/12/15

5/14/15

8/13/15

11/12/15

52.2 Avg

range

34-75

PPB

N/A

80 MCL

Contained in chlorinated water

 

 

Haloacetic Acids

No

2/12/15

5/14/15

8/13/15

11/12/15

24.2 Avg

range

3.4-52.0

PPB

N/A

60

By-product of drinking water disinfection needed to kill harmful organisms

 

 

Lead

No

6/17/15

3.32

range

<0.0010 – 0.0098

PPB

15

AL = 15

Contained in Finished water, an artifact of old piping and lead soldered joints

 

 

Copper

No

6/17/15

0.143

range

0.0010-0.42

Mg/L

1.3

Mg/L=1.3

Contained in finished water, an artifact of old piping and lead soldered joints

 

 

INORGANIC

Barium

No

3/19/15

0.022

PPM

2

2

Erosion of natural deposits

 

 

Chloride

No

3/19/15

30

PPM

N/A

250

Naturally occurring

 

 

 

Chromium

No

3/19/15

0.0035

PPM

N/A

0.1

Erosion of natural deposits

 

 

Sulfate

No

3/19/15

12

PPM

N/A

250

Naturally occurring

 

 

Sodium

No

3/19/15

       20

      

PPM

N/A

No limit

Naturally occuring

 

 

Nitrate

No

2/19/15

5/21/15

8/20/15

11/19/15

Avg 0.95 range

0.89-1

PPM

10

10.0 MCL

Erosion of natural deposits

 

 

Gross Alpha

No

04/16/15

7.15

pCi/L

0

15 PCi/L

Contained in soil or sedimentary rock formations

 

 

Gross Beta

No

04/16/15

ND

PCi/L

0

4 PCi/L

Contained in soil or sedimentary rock formations

 

 

Combined Radium 226 & 228

No

4/16/15

ND

PCi/L

0

5 PCi/L

Contained in soil or sedimentary rock formations

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
























Notes:

1 – Turbidity is a measure of the cloudiness of the water.

2 – The level presented represents the 90th percentile of the 10 sites tested. A percentile is a value on a scale of 100 that indicates the percent of a distribution that is equal to or below it.  The 90th percentile is equal to or greater than 90% of the lead values detected at your water system.  In this case, 10 samples were collected at your water system and the 90th percentile value was the second highest value (3.3  ug/L).  The action level for lead was not exceeded at any of the sites tested.

3 – The level presented represents the 90th percentile of the 10 samples collected.  The action level for copper was not exceeded at any of the sites tested.

 

 

 

Definitions:

Maximum Contaminant Level  (MCL): The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water.  MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible.

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health.  MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

Action Level  (AL): The concentration of a contaminant, which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements, which a water system must follow.

Treatment Technique (TT): A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.

Non-Detects (ND): Laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.

Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU): A measure of the clarity of water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.

Milligrams per liter (mg/l): Corresponds to one part of liquid in one million parts of liquid (parts per million - ppm). 

Micrograms per liter (ug/l): Corresponds to one part of liquid in one billion parts of liquid (parts per billion - ppb).

Picocuries per liter (pCi/L): a measure of the radioactivity in water.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL): The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water.  There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDFL): The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health.  MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contamination.

Color: the presence of dissolved substance in water.

Hardness:  a characteristic of water caused mainly by the salts and other mineral materials of minerals of mineral origin.

Inorganic chemicals:  materials such as sand, salt, iron, calcium salts and other mineral materials of mineral origin.

Odor threshold: the minimum odor of a water sample that can just be detected after successive dilutions with odorless water.

 

 

WHAT DOES THIS INFORMATION MEAN?

As you can see by the table, our system had no violations.  We have learned through our testing that some contaminants have been detected; however, these contaminants were detected below the level allowed by the State.

 

If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women, infants, and young children. It is possible that lead levels at your home may be higher than at other homes in the community as a result of materials used in your home’s plumbing. The Village of Weedsport is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791) or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

 

Turbidity is a measure of the cloudiness of water. We monitor it because it is a good indicator of the effectiveness of our filtration system. Turbidity itself has no health effects. However, turbidity can interfere with disinfections and provide a medium for microbiological growth. Turbidity may indicate the presence of disease causing organisms.  These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites that can cause systems such as nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches. Please pay special attention to the addition statement in this document regarding Cryoptosporidium and Giardia. Plant monitoring equipment has been updated and plant procedures have been modified to allow treatment of our water and keep it well within all regulatory requirements.

 

INFORMATION ON RADIOLOGICAL TESTING

Radiological Testing was performed in 2015. Testing was below limits. Testing will be due again in 2024.

 

Is our water system meeting other rules that govern operations?

 During 2015, our system was in compliance with all applicable State and Federal drinking water operating monitoring and reporting requirements.

 

Do I Need to Take Special Precautions?

Although our drinking water met or exceeded state and federal regulations, some people may be more vulnerable to disease causing microorganisms or pathogens in drinking water than the general population.  Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections.  These people should seek advice from their health care provider about their drinking water.  EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium, Giardia and other microbial pathogens are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). 

 

Why Save Water and How to Avoid Wasting It?

Although our system has an adequate amount of water to meet present and future demands, there are a number of reasons why it is important to conserve water:

¨        Saving water saves energy and some of the costs associated with both of these necessities of life;

¨        Saving water reduces the cost of energy required to pump water and the need to construct costly new wells, pumping systems and water towers; and

¨        saving water lessens the strain on the water system during a dry spell or drought, helping to avoid severe water use restrictions so that essential fire -fighting needs are met.

 

You can play a role in conserving water by becoming conscious of the amount of water your household is using, and by looking for ways to use less whenever you can.  It is not hard to conserve water.  Conservation tips include:

 

¨        Automatic dishwashers use 15 gallons for every cycle, regardless of how many dishes are loaded.  So get a run for your money and load it to capacity.

¨        Turn off the tap when brushing your teeth.

¨        Check every faucet in your home for leaks.  Just a slow drip can waste 15 to 20 gallons a day.  Fix it and you can save almost 6,000 gallons per year.

¨        Check your toilets for leaks by putting a few drops of food coloring in the tank, watch for a few minutes to see if the color shows up in the bowl.  It is not uncommon to lose up to 100 gallons a day from one of these otherwise invisible toilet leaks.  Fix it and you save more than 30,000 gallons a year.

¨        Use your water meter to detect hidden leaks.  Simply turn off all taps and water using appliances, then check the meter after 15 minutes, if it moved, you have a leak.

¨        Retrofit plumbing fixtures

¨        be more conscientious of water use.

 

 FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS & ANSWERS

What affects the taste of my water?

The taste of drinking water is affected by its mineral content as well as the presence of chlorine, which is used to protect against potential bacterial contamination. Sometimes plumbing can cause a metallic flavor, especially if water has been sitting in pipes for many hours. Taste, however, does not necessarily indicate a higher or lower degree of contamination. At times, when conditions are right, algae blooms occur in our lake sometimes causing objectionable odors and taste in the finished drinking water. Although algae are removed during the treatment process, some of their metabolites may be left behind. The two most common metabolites are geosmin and 2-methylisoborneal (MIB). Even though these compounds are harmless, the human sense of taste and smell are extremely sensitive to them and can detect them in water at concentrations as low as 5 parts per trillion. To give you an idea of what a “part per trillion” is, consider this – One part per trillion is equivalent to one cent in 10 million dollars.

 

What affects the way my water looks?

In addition to naturally occurring minerals, our water also includes small amounts of iron picked up from our cast-iron water mains. When a surge of pressure occurs, usually from a main break or a fire hydrant being used, the sediment becomes stirred into the water. During these episodes, the water supply to your home can be tinted yellow or even brownish-red. The iron is harmless and settles out again in a few hours. Please be aware that it will stain clothing, so don’t wash your clothes if you experience iron-tinted water. Also, avoid running hot water at these times, if possible, so that your water heater doesn’t refill with iron tinted water.

 

Do I really need to buy a Water Filter or Home Treatment System?

The decision to buy water filters or home treatment systems is yours. Our water meets and exceeds rigid State and Federal Standards. If you decide to buy a filter system, be a smart shopper and do some homework. Be sure that any treatment device you buy is registered with the National Sanitation Foundation (NSF). Information on these systems is available at libraries, or from the NSF.

Contact the NSF toll free at 877-867-3435 or visit www.nsf.org.

 

Closing

Thank you for allowing us to continue to provide your family with quality drinking water this year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make improvements that will benefit all of our customers. The costs of these improvements may be reflected in the rate structure. Rate adjustments may be necessary in order to address these improvements.  We ask that all our customers help us protect our water sources, which are the heart of our community. Please call our office if you have questions.

 

A NOTE FROM NYS DEPT OF HEALTH

The NYS Department of Health has completed a source water assessment for the City of Auburn, based on available information.  Possible and actual threats to this drinking water source were evaluated.  This source water assessment includes a susceptibility rating based on the risk posed by each potential source of contamination and how easily contaminants can move through the subsurface to lakes.  The susceptibility rating is an estimate of the potential for contamination of the source water, it does not mean that the water delivered to consumers is, or will become contaminated.  (See the section of this document Are There Contaminants In Our Drinking Water? (For a list of the contaminants that have been detected in the drinking water)  The source water assessments are intended to provide managers with additional information for protecting source waters into the future.

 

As mentioned before, our water is derived primarily from Owasco Lake.  The source water assessment has rated this source as having an elevated susceptibility to protozoa and phosphorus due to the amount of agricultural lands in the assessment area and the quantity of wastewater discharged from municipal wastewater treatment plants to surface water.  In addition, this source water assessment rated Owasco Lake as having an elevated susceptibility to pesticide contamination due to the amount of agricultural lands.

 

County and state health departments will use this information to direct future source water protection activities.  These may include water quality monitoring, resource management, and planning and education programs.  A copy of the complete assessment is available for review by calling the Cayuga County Health Department at 253-1405.

                                               

 

 

 

ADDITIONAL SOURCES OF INFORMATION

Jim Saroodis                                                                United States Environmental Protection

Superintendent of Public Works                                 Agency Safe Drinking Water Hotline,

315-283-0345                                                              1-800-426-4791

 

 

Jeff Goodell                                                                 www.epa.gov/safewater/

Wastewater Treatment Plant Operator

315-834-6411 

 

Cayuga County Health Department

Kathleen Cuddy, Public Health Director

315-253-1560

 

Eileen O’Connor Director of Environmental Health 

315-253-1405                                     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weedsport Area Chamber of Commerce
March 22, 2016


The Weedsport Area Chamber of Commerce is organized to advance the general welfare and prosperity of the Weedsport Area so that its citizens and all areas of its business community shall prosper. All necessary means of promotion shall be provided and particular attention and emphasis shall be given to the economic, civic, commercial, cultural, industrial and educational interests of the area.

 

 

Cayuga County Recycling Events
May 26, 2015
Click on the link to see upcoming Cayuga County sponsored recycling events.